in the water

We have been in the water a lot this summer.  The Tuckaseegee River, the Chesapeake Bay, the Pasquotank River, and most often, the pool at William’s uncle’s house.  We call the pool the Fairview Country Club and try to get over there every afternoon that is not stormy.  It is a small pool with a diving board at one end, and steps decending into the pool at the other end.  The steps have been great for the younger children as they get used to being in the water.  They can touch the bottom and learn how their bodies work in the water while feeling safe.  As they get more confident, they leave the steps and start swimming.

This summer, Hythe made the transition from staying mostly at the steps, to swimming (dog-paddling) from the steps to an underwater bench on the side of the shallow end.  He paddled back and forth along the edge of the pool for a few weeks.  Then, he got up the courage to jump from the side of the pool into my arms.  A few weeks later her jumped into the pool on his own.  He was so excited to figure out that he could do it, that soon he was jumping into the deep end on his own and swimming all over the pool.  Within two weeks of learning he could jump into the pool by himself, he was actually doing flips into the deep end of the pool.  One day he said, “mom, watch this” and flipped into the pool.  I couldn’t believe it!  He’d not even been jumping into the water 2 weeks before!

He carried his flipping and love of jumping in to all the water we visited this summer, most notably, the Pasquotank River, where my mother lives.  The water there is too deep for him to touch, but deep enough to jump safely (we taught him quite a bit of water and diving safety once we realized he loved it so much).  He would jump, flip, and dive for as long as we stay at the pool or by the water.  He really grew up this summer, and I loved seeing his confidence and abilities grow so amazingly.

 

hythe

flip

ladder

jump

flip2

pencil

hythe2

dying with marigold

yarn

cotton

ctton2

I have been doing some natural dying this summer – and enjoying the results.  I dyed some garments I made with marigolds from my garden, and got a rich, bright yellow.  Then I made an iron bath (vinegar and rusty nails) and dipped the dyed cloth in that.  You can see the results in the last picture above.  It turned it a bit darker and slightly olive.  But, I did not think the contrast great enough for what I wanted, and I over-dyed the iron/marigold garment in a quick walnut dye bath.  And, that’s where I went wrong.  Either the mordant did not work anymore, or the iron made the shirt take up dyes differently, but I ended up with a dark brown-ish overall color with lots of spots of very dark brown or slightly light yellow. It would have been ok, except the dark brown spots looked like I dripped oil on it (and they were right in the front).  Nice contrast with the marigold yellow, but ugh! those spots!!  I did another shirt with red onion skins from Flying Cloud Farm, and got a little closer to the color I wanted.

spots

I also dyed a bit of wool yarn to see what the results would be.  I loved the color and later dyed the same type of yarn with onion skins.  Interestingly,the color was really similar.  It seems quite easy to get some kind of yellow (or brown) color with natural dying with the things I can find around here, but I’d like to get some other colors too!

I’ll keep trying – I am enjoying the process.

 

 

busy summer fun

I was away from this blog for a bit over the summer.  School let out and it felt like we were off at full tilt.  We had cousins visiting nearly all of the summer break (when we weren’t visiting them!).  It was fun and occasionally exhausting!  We loved visiting with so many wonderful little cousins and their parents, of course – as well my mom, sister-in-law and brother-in-law!  There was a lot of happy screaming, lots of play time, and fun suppers.

Over the summer break, we spent nearly a week by a remote river in our area (Tuckaseegee), playing with friends for a few days, then playing on the river just as our small family.  It is such a beautiful, peaceful place where we read, play games, explore the river, swim, and fish.

Then, we had a couple of weeks at camp here at the farm, then a week on the coast, and back home for a week of “nothing to do” (except William and I had to work, Anne had a camp, and Evva came up with some major outing everyday).  Then, summer break was over.  We are back to a routine, which is good.  Summer certainly does not feel over though.  We have weeks left of swimming, melon eating, and running around barefoot and that is nice.

I’ll catch up here with some of my doings soon, but I leave some pictures from some of our favorite summer fun (excepting the beach, where I did not bring my camera – sun, saltwater, sunscreen, and 7 kids running around convinced me to keep the camera at the house).

flowers

D

cookies

Phebe

WandE

cove

reading

second falls

fsishing

fishing

waterfalls

top of waterfall

offtocamp
Off to camp – they could walk to farm camp everyday.

wildlife at our house (cute and creepy)

turtle

turtle and kids

turtle2.jpg

The other day, Evva found this tiny turtle right behind our house.  She thought it was a toy until she saw it move.  It was the cutest little turtle I’ve ever seen.  We had a hard time sending it back out into that large scary world, but we did so (and very quickly since we didn’t want to disturb such a little creature).

Then, the next day, we found a large black snake slithering across our front porch, and a few minutes later, another in the driveway.  The kids followed them around for a little while until they lost interest (kids, not snakes).  I hope they (snakes, not kids) go eat the voles in my garden (and not the baby turtle!).

snake

snake1.jpg

 

indigo

vat

drip

napkins

morenapkins

indigo

I made a vat of indigo dye the other day, partly to practice for a class I am going to teach next month on natural dying, partly because I needed something creative and fun for the kids to do, and partly because I hated the dull gray linen napkins we use all the time.  Those napkins looked like dirty dish water and I was getting to the point that I wanted to give them away.  But, they are so useful, large, and we had LOTS of them.  I gave two to each child and showed them what the possibilities were with the dye and rubber bands, and I let them go.  They came up with some pretty great creations, which they were so very proud of – “here’s MY napkin”, “mom, put MY napkin in my lunchbox”.  It was a lot of fun, and felt almost like magic to take the napkins out of the dye vat looking bright green and watch them turn dark blue as the pattern was revealed when the rubber bands were taken out.  A pretty great afternoon activity – and that dye bucket is still going – hopefully for most of the summer.  I’m thinking I’ll dye some stained clothes, fabric, more napkins, etc.

snacks in the yard

cherries

006

elderberries

eatng

hands

We’ve just ended cherry and shell pea season, but blueberries, raspberries, and black raspberries are starting up.  And, mulberries, which seem to last nearly all summer, have just started up.  All these berries (and stone fruit and peas) mean that the kids can go out in the yard and snack whenever they want.  One of the favorite places to snack is at our large and flimsy-ish mulberry tree that leans over the rock wall where the blueberries are planted.  This means the kids can stand on the rock wall and pick mulberries to eat.  But, the more adventurous one(s) head up into the tree to snag the ripe berries and to shake branches so other ripe ones will fall on the ground for their siblings to eat.  It is a treat, and since the berries ripen individually, over time, rarely do any berries make it into the house.  They are all eaten “in the field”.  And, a tell-tale sign of the snacking are the purple stained fingers and hands.  They are such a treat – the berries and those precious hands!.

 

rompers

rompere

romper

romper2

romper1

sis

I sewed up these two rompers last week at the requests of our two daughters.  I made one for Evva last year and she wore it often.  This year, Anne wanted one and I realized Evva’s was getting very short, so I decided to make two.  Anne knew exactly the fabric she wanted and I picked out the fabric for Evva’s.  And, I had a bunch of chambray left from another project to make the yokes and cuffs.  I found the pattern (from Figgy) fairly easy, but not terribly intuitive (and with a few extra, and superfluous (in my opinion) steps).  I made modifications to make it go a little faster and got these done fairly quickly.  I love these rompers and the girls are delighted.  They have been wearing them often since they came off the sewing table, and that is gratifying as well.

Love these cute sisters!

jump

 

turtle

front

toptop1turtle

The children found a turtle in the yard this weekend.  A female Eastern box turtle (we think).  We all admired her shell, her ability to completely withdraw, and her age.  Hythe became particularly attached to her.  He held her and gently played with her for hours. Then he found a box and set it up as a home for her.  He took her to a party that night, named her Climber, and was quite devoted to her.  She got over her shyness and came out of her shell for Hythe.  We told him that he would have to put the turtle back in the woods that night, but when the time came, he cried furiously and said he wanted to keep her as a pet.  We decided there was no use arguing with a tired child, so we kept Climber until the morning.  I did a little on-line research (as you do when up against an issue you know next to nothing about) and found out that box turtles are hard keepers – they can live up to 100 years in the wild, but can die within 3 days in captivity, and that healthy captivity requires a lot of habitat manipulation and equipment that we don’t have.  In the morning, Hythe came to me and I explained what I had learned about keeping turtles as pets.  He said, “I’ll let her go this morning.”  Which is what he did.  He shed a few tears, too, as he watched her crawl away.

porch living

porchboys

writing

together

an

 

ev

There is a lot of living going on on the porch this time of year.  The weather is allowing us to be outside a lot – eating, playing, drawing, writing, reading, sleeping.  The porch swing is everyone’s favorite place to sit and rest, or read, or nap.   The porch provides shade, comfortable seats, freedom to be messier, room to spread out.  I love going out to read a magazine or my book, to drink a cup of tea, or to eat lunch.  I’m so happy to be out there and to see the children out there.  Porch living is the best!

sowing and sewing

hy

planning

sowing

sowplanting

A week or so ago, Hythe asked me for his own garden.  After some negotiating, he agreed to let me give him a section of the garden we already have.  It had nothing planted in it and it could be his own.  With some help, he dug up some squash (or gourd or pumpkin) plants growing out of the compost pile and transplanted them in his garden.  He also planted some lettuce and cucumber starts from his aunt and uncle, and I bought him a cantaloupe plant from a farm stand.  Then, he sowed some sweet corn seeds (with his cousin, Levi’s help).  I think he still has plans to get more plants in that little patch of dirt – probably pumpkins, but maybe beans.  We’ll see.  I love seeing him in the garden, sincerely interested and working.

And, when I asked him if he would like to learn to sew, he said yes.  I made some napkins for my mother and mother-in-law for Mother’s Day, and let the children do the top stitching around them.  I set Hythe up at the machine, explained how to do everything and then set him loose.  He did remarkable well, keeping his top stitching fairly strait.  And, most importantly, he enjoyed it!

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